UWEC's Master Plan

college plans big changes within the next 20 years

Jenna Campbell

An map of what the UWEC campus could look like in 20 years, assuming the entirety of their master plan comes to fruition. Check out a high-res map.
 
An map of what the UWEC campus could look like in
20 years, assuming the entirety of their master plan
comes to fruition. Check out a high-res map.

Roughly a year and a half after discussion began about UW-Eau Claire’s master plan, the demolition, reconstruction, renovation, and addition of many UWEC campus buildings will soon be fully underway.

Mike Rindo, chair of UWEC’s planning committee, said the UW System asked all of its campuses to revise their master plans.  The committee has already collaborated with UWEC students, faculty, and staff, as well as members of the UW System at the state level, representatives of the local government, and stakeholders from adjacent neighborhoods and institutions.

“As you are developing projects for campus, you have the opportunity to have conversations with people,” Rindo said. “It’s about people having the opportunity to come forward and say, ‘This is what I like, and this is what I’d like to see changed.’ ”

Rindo calls the much-discussed-and-tweaked preferred campus alternative a “broad guide” which will steer the physical development of the university over the next 20 years. 

The first thing on the master plan’s agenda is the construction of a new campus Student Center, which will begin in spring (see our previous story on it at VolumeOne.org). The planning committee is also in its final stages of approval for a new education building on Water Street (between Haas and HSS). But these are just the tip of the iceberg.

According to the plan, they will expand facilities on Water Street, relocate the sciences, reserve future building sites on lower campus, expand residential options, provide critical open spaces on upper campus, and extend the campus out to State Street and Clairemont Avenue.

If everything goes as planned, at least three new residential halls will be added to upper campus within the next 20 years, and a lower campus residential hall will be constructed south of Schneider Hall on Roosevelt Avenue to replace the two current lower campus dorms (Katharine Thomas and Putnam), which would be demolished.

On upper campus, McPhee/Olson may become exclusively for recreation and athletics, while kinesiology would move to a new or repurposed facility. Hilltop could become exclusively recreational with dining moving to a repurposed Horan Hall, and the tennis courts and Crest Wellness Center demolished in favor of residence halls (they’ve had consistent overflow into area hotels for several years now).

 

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